Date posted: 25/01/2021 5 min read

Meet the CA turned GP: Dr Daniel McIntosh CA

Tauranga doctor Dr Daniel McIntosh CA chairs the audit committee of The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners.

In Brief

  • Dr Daniel McIntosh CA qualified as a doctor after being made redundant from Arthur Andersen.
  • His accounting experience has been invaluable for his GP practice during the COVID pandemic.
  • Day to day, he is involved with strategic planning and financial management of his practice.

As told to Hannah Tattersall

I had no idea what I wanted to do after school. I opted for a business degree [at the University of Waikato in Hamilton] in the hope I could apply it to just about anything.

In 2002, I landed a role at Arthur Andersen, only to be made redundant 10 weeks into the job when the company imploded during the high-profile Enron scandal. It was a pretty rough start to my working life.

I completed a post-graduate diploma in public health followed by the six-year medical degree at Auckland University. In 2012, I became a house officer at Waikato Hospital.

Accountancy and medicine might not seem the most natural of bedfellows. However, COVID-19 was just one event that proved how invaluable a mix of medical and accounting experience can be when working as a GP.

During Level Four lockdown in New Zealand, as we waited for the first wave of the pandemic to hit, preparation was huge – accompanied by massive uncertainty and anxiety. Tasks included taking measures to protect patients and prevent spread.

Later, demand for services fell by 30-40%. Ensuring the ongoing viability and sustainability of the practice was a major responsibility.

Daniel McIntosh CAPicture: Daniel McIntosh CA.

“Demand for services fell by 30-40%. Ensuring the ongoing viability and sustainability of the practice was a major responsibility.”
Dr Daniel McIntosh CA

I helped redeploy staff, protect vulnerable staff, and communicate our financial position to advocates such as The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners.

Ensuring the financial viability of the practice meant we were able to provide continuity of care to our patients at their time of greatest need.

I’ve been involved in Primary Health Contract collective bargaining and I’ve also just joined the board of the Waikato/Bay of Plenty chapter of the [GP] College.

Day to day, I’m involved with strategic planning and financial management of my practice which, once again, brings my accountancy experience to the fore.

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